Jefs - Javascript editor for SharePoint

Jefs is a lightweight, in-browser editor that lets you customize SharePoint pages with javascript, html and css.

Announcements
Jefs version 2 was released on May 1, 2012 and is in the early stages of testing. Please provide feedback, submit bugs, review source code and submit pull requests. Most importantly please be patient as we weed out the bugs.

Features
  • Javascript, HTML and CSS editors with syntax highlighting
  • Ability to easily reference external Javascript libraries such as jQuery
  • Sandboxed solution
  • Split screen with resizable panels
  • Ability to add the content editor web part to the web part page and link it to the HTML content of Jefs
  • Launched from Ribbon, can be added to other navigation components within SharePoint

Installation
Download Jefs.wsp from CodePlex and install using PowerShell:

-webAbsUrl (required) Absolute url of the web where you want Jefs installed
-wspPath (optional) Relative path to the Jefs.wsp file. This parameter is optional if you place the wsp file in the same directory as the script.
For additional information, navigate to Installation Instructions

Getting started
See the Documentation tab for information on how to get started with Jefs.

Source code
https://github.com/tstojecki/jefs
Pull requests are welcomed and appreciated.
Do not use the source code tab on codeplex, it's outdated code that will eventually be removed.

Little History
Jefs version 1 supported a single editor for writing and embedding javascript on a SharePoint page. The editor ran within a modal dialog and didn't allow for HTML or CSS content to be added.
Version 2 has a new interface that runs outside of SharePoint's master page, which means we could dedicate the entire page to the editor. Increasing the real estate available to editors was the main driver, however it was also important to minimize the footprint the client side script has on a SharePoint page by hosting a lot of the libraries independent from the master page. Finally the modal dialog interface in SharePoint, while good for many scenarios, turned out to be inflexible and somewhat fragile for this kind of interface.

Open source libraries
Jefs leverages several open source libraries, including: While jsbin.com wasn't directly referenced in the code base, it was the inspiration for Jefs and a tremendous learning resource. Simply put, I like it so much that I wanted to have a tool like that for my development environment, which happens to be SharePoint.
I highly recommend http://jsbin.com

Twitter
You can find me on twitter at @tstojecki

Last edited May 2, 2012 at 3:49 PM by tstojecki, version 52